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39 articles
  • 30 Mar 2017
    An age old practice, graffiti holds special significance as one of the elements of hip hop culture. Graffiti as an urban art form has existed since at least the 1950s,the link between hip hop and graffiti evolved as a competition, much like the dance moves of the hip hop culture.            Graffiti in hip hop began as a way of "tagging" for one's crew/gang, and developed during the 1970s on the subways of New York, and later expanded to the city walls themselves. Graffiti began to show up on subways in New York and other cities as a form of expression of the culture who listened to rap music.   Graffiti is considered one of the four elements of hip hop (along with emceeing, DJing, and B-Boying).        
    1502   Posted by Artistter Team
  • An age old practice, graffiti holds special significance as one of the elements of hip hop culture. Graffiti as an urban art form has existed since at least the 1950s,the link between hip hop and graffiti evolved as a competition, much like the dance moves of the hip hop culture.            Graffiti in hip hop began as a way of "tagging" for one's crew/gang, and developed during the 1970s on the subways of New York, and later expanded to the city walls themselves. Graffiti began to show up on subways in New York and other cities as a form of expression of the culture who listened to rap music.   Graffiti is considered one of the four elements of hip hop (along with emceeing, DJing, and B-Boying).        
    Mar 30, 2017 1502  
  • 18 Feb 2017
      These crazy footwear designs are innovation in footwear designing.. The amount of creativity in each piece shows how much fashion really is just another art form.    1. No sole shoes By Julian Hanks       2. Coffee by Kobi Levi     3. Foot Gloves     4. Chewing Gum by Kobi Levi       5. Platform Shoes   6. Gadget Shoes   7. Alien Shoes By Alexander McQueen   8. Cardboard Shoes      
    575   Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  •   These crazy footwear designs are innovation in footwear designing.. The amount of creativity in each piece shows how much fashion really is just another art form.    1. No sole shoes By Julian Hanks       2. Coffee by Kobi Levi     3. Foot Gloves     4. Chewing Gum by Kobi Levi       5. Platform Shoes   6. Gadget Shoes   7. Alien Shoes By Alexander McQueen   8. Cardboard Shoes      
    Feb 18, 2017 575  
  • 07 Feb 2017
    Ever thought of bringing drawings to life.... Danish artist, HuskMitNavn, have combined 2D & 3D techniques to bring his drawings in an incredible way. The drawings are as simple black & white drawings like opening a food can, fishing, ironing and so on.... The artist have created this piece of art work by merely folding & cutting pages to give them realistic view.                                             Source: Borepanda      
    719   Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  • Ever thought of bringing drawings to life.... Danish artist, HuskMitNavn, have combined 2D & 3D techniques to bring his drawings in an incredible way. The drawings are as simple black & white drawings like opening a food can, fishing, ironing and so on.... The artist have created this piece of art work by merely folding & cutting pages to give them realistic view.                                             Source: Borepanda      
    Feb 07, 2017 719  
  • 30 Jan 2017
      1. WADI EL-HOL SCRIPT In the 1990s, a pair of Yale archaeologists discovered a graffiti-covered cliff wall at the Wadi el-Hol (Gulch of Terror) in Egypt. Most of the inscriptions were in systems they could recognize, but one of them was unfamiliar. It looks like an early transition from a hieroglyphic to an alphabetic system, but it hasn't yet been deciphered. 2. CRETAN HIEROGLYPHICS   The excavations on Crete also revealed a third type of writing system, with symbols that looked more picture-like than those of the linear scripts. Some of these symbols are similar to elements in Linear A. It is assumed that the hieroglyphic script developed into Linear A, though the two systems were both in use during the same time period.  3. OLMEC WRITING   The Olmecs were an ancient Mexican civilization best known for the statues they left behind: the so-called "colossal heads." In 1999, their writing system was revealed when road builders unearthed an inscribed stone tablet. The tablet shows 62 symbols; some look like corn or bugs, and some are more abstract. It has been dated to 900 B.C., which would make it the oldest example of writing in the Western Hemisphere. 4. SINGAPORE STONE There once was a giant engraved slab made of sandstone at the mouth of the Singapore River. It had been there for 700 years or so when, in 1819, workers uncovered it while clearing away jungle trees. A few scholars got a look at it before it was blown to bits in order to make space for a fort to protect the British settlements. The parts that didn’t end up in the river were eventually used for road gravel, though some fragments were saved. The script hasn't been deciphered, but there have been various suggestions for what language it might represent: ancient Ceylonese, Tamil, Kawi, Old Javanese, and Sanskrit.  5. RONGORONGO   When missionaries got to Easter Island in the 1860s, they found wooden tablets carved with symbols. They asked the Rapanui natives what the inscriptions meant, and were told that nobody knew anymore, since the Peruvians had killed off all the wise men. The Rapanui used the tablets as firewood or fishing reels, and by the end of the century they were nearly all gone. Rongorongo is written in alternating directions; you read a line from left to right, then turn the tablet 180 degrees and read the next line.  6. PROTO-ELAMITE   This ancient writing system was used more than 5000 years ago in what is now Iran. Written from right to left, the script is unlike any other ancient scripts; while the proto-Elamites appear to have borrowed the idea for a written language from their Mesopotamian contemporaries, they apparently invented their own symbols—and didn't bother to keep track of them in an organized way.             Source: Mentalfloss
    977   Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  •   1. WADI EL-HOL SCRIPT In the 1990s, a pair of Yale archaeologists discovered a graffiti-covered cliff wall at the Wadi el-Hol (Gulch of Terror) in Egypt. Most of the inscriptions were in systems they could recognize, but one of them was unfamiliar. It looks like an early transition from a hieroglyphic to an alphabetic system, but it hasn't yet been deciphered. 2. CRETAN HIEROGLYPHICS   The excavations on Crete also revealed a third type of writing system, with symbols that looked more picture-like than those of the linear scripts. Some of these symbols are similar to elements in Linear A. It is assumed that the hieroglyphic script developed into Linear A, though the two systems were both in use during the same time period.  3. OLMEC WRITING   The Olmecs were an ancient Mexican civilization best known for the statues they left behind: the so-called "colossal heads." In 1999, their writing system was revealed when road builders unearthed an inscribed stone tablet. The tablet shows 62 symbols; some look like corn or bugs, and some are more abstract. It has been dated to 900 B.C., which would make it the oldest example of writing in the Western Hemisphere. 4. SINGAPORE STONE There once was a giant engraved slab made of sandstone at the mouth of the Singapore River. It had been there for 700 years or so when, in 1819, workers uncovered it while clearing away jungle trees. A few scholars got a look at it before it was blown to bits in order to make space for a fort to protect the British settlements. The parts that didn’t end up in the river were eventually used for road gravel, though some fragments were saved. The script hasn't been deciphered, but there have been various suggestions for what language it might represent: ancient Ceylonese, Tamil, Kawi, Old Javanese, and Sanskrit.  5. RONGORONGO   When missionaries got to Easter Island in the 1860s, they found wooden tablets carved with symbols. They asked the Rapanui natives what the inscriptions meant, and were told that nobody knew anymore, since the Peruvians had killed off all the wise men. The Rapanui used the tablets as firewood or fishing reels, and by the end of the century they were nearly all gone. Rongorongo is written in alternating directions; you read a line from left to right, then turn the tablet 180 degrees and read the next line.  6. PROTO-ELAMITE   This ancient writing system was used more than 5000 years ago in what is now Iran. Written from right to left, the script is unlike any other ancient scripts; while the proto-Elamites appear to have borrowed the idea for a written language from their Mesopotamian contemporaries, they apparently invented their own symbols—and didn't bother to keep track of them in an organized way.             Source: Mentalfloss
    Jan 30, 2017 977  
  • 27 Jan 2017
      Food Wasted was photographed to perfection to make a magnificient display of artwork.   1. Pineapple 2. Lemon 3. Ice-Cream 4. Strawberry 5. Indian Sweet Cham Cham 6. Jelly 7. Waterlemon                       Source: finedininglovers Image credit: Klaus Pichler      
    591   Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  •   Food Wasted was photographed to perfection to make a magnificient display of artwork.   1. Pineapple 2. Lemon 3. Ice-Cream 4. Strawberry 5. Indian Sweet Cham Cham 6. Jelly 7. Waterlemon                       Source: finedininglovers Image credit: Klaus Pichler      
    Jan 27, 2017 591  
  • 14 Jan 2017
      1. Boshintang, Korea This supposedly health-giving Korean soup is made with spring onions, dandelions, a host of spices and one infamous ingredient: dog meat. Though you will struggle to find it on menus today, it’s still popular with the older generation and generally agreed to taste better than it smells.     2. Muktuk, Greenland A traditional Inuit meal of frozen whale skin and blubber, muktuk is normally served either raw or pickled. It looks a little bit like licorice allsorts and has several layers: the skin (which apparently tastes like hazelnuts), the fat (chewy) and the protective layer in between (even more chewy). Don’t eat if wearing dentures.   Photo Source: CutterLight   3. Casu marzu, Italy Known as “rotten cheese”, Sardinia’s casu marzu is made from Pecorino that has gone bad – really bad. The larvae of cheese flies (piophila casei) are added to the Pecorino, hatching inside, burrowing around and digesting the fats. The result is a weeping, tongue-burning delicacy that you can eat with or without the maggots.   Photo Source: FoodBible   4. Century egg, China Someone in ancient China did, lived to tell the tale and now it’s an established delicacy. The eggs (also known as hundred-year eggs or pidan) are covered in clay, ash and salt for months, by which time the yolk is dark green and stinks of sulphur.    Photo Source: aromacookery   5. Stargazey Pie, England A pie with fish that stare at the sky: Stargazey originates from the Cornish village of Mousehole in England, and is served on Tom Bawcock’s Eve (23rd December). According to legend, this heroic sixteenth-century sailor rowed out one December evening in high storms and returned with a catch big enough to feed the starving residents.   Photo Source: Peersy   6. Locusts, Israel Israelis have been eradicating the pests in a unique way: by eating them. Deep-fried and chocolate-covered locusts are apparently going down a storm.   Photo Source: The Times   7. White ant eggs soup, Laos One of the world’s more unusual soups, Gaeng Kai Mot Daeng combines a mixture of ant eggs and partial embryos from the white ant, plus a few baby ants to add sourness. If your stomach can handle it, the flavour is supposedly quite tasty: sharp and delicate, and a little like shrimp.   Photo Source: Backpacker Traveler   8. Crispy tarantulas, Cambodia These spiders were first eaten by Cambodians starving under the Khmer Rouge regime. Bizarrely, they became popular and are now served as a deep-fried snack throughout the country. Apparently they taste a bit like crab.   Photo Source: OMG   9. Balut, Philippines  This fertilised duck egg, with its partly developed embryo inside, is boiled alive and then eaten from the shell with salt, chilli and vinegar. You’re supposed to tap a hole in the top of the shell, sup the savoury liquid and then crunch down the rest of what’s inside – feathers, bones and all.    Photo Source: Kawaloing Pinoy   10. Escamoles, Mexico Escamoles are the larvae of a venomous ant species that lay their eggs deep down in the roots of agave or maguey plants in Mexico (so harvesting them is not a barrel of laughs). The larvae are said to have a consistency akin to cottage cheese and taste somewhat nutty; they’re normally eaten as the filling in a taco or omelette.   Photo Source: Couche Tard     Source: Roughguides    
    869   Posted by Artistter Team
  •   1. Boshintang, Korea This supposedly health-giving Korean soup is made with spring onions, dandelions, a host of spices and one infamous ingredient: dog meat. Though you will struggle to find it on menus today, it’s still popular with the older generation and generally agreed to taste better than it smells.     2. Muktuk, Greenland A traditional Inuit meal of frozen whale skin and blubber, muktuk is normally served either raw or pickled. It looks a little bit like licorice allsorts and has several layers: the skin (which apparently tastes like hazelnuts), the fat (chewy) and the protective layer in between (even more chewy). Don’t eat if wearing dentures.   Photo Source: CutterLight   3. Casu marzu, Italy Known as “rotten cheese”, Sardinia’s casu marzu is made from Pecorino that has gone bad – really bad. The larvae of cheese flies (piophila casei) are added to the Pecorino, hatching inside, burrowing around and digesting the fats. The result is a weeping, tongue-burning delicacy that you can eat with or without the maggots.   Photo Source: FoodBible   4. Century egg, China Someone in ancient China did, lived to tell the tale and now it’s an established delicacy. The eggs (also known as hundred-year eggs or pidan) are covered in clay, ash and salt for months, by which time the yolk is dark green and stinks of sulphur.    Photo Source: aromacookery   5. Stargazey Pie, England A pie with fish that stare at the sky: Stargazey originates from the Cornish village of Mousehole in England, and is served on Tom Bawcock’s Eve (23rd December). According to legend, this heroic sixteenth-century sailor rowed out one December evening in high storms and returned with a catch big enough to feed the starving residents.   Photo Source: Peersy   6. Locusts, Israel Israelis have been eradicating the pests in a unique way: by eating them. Deep-fried and chocolate-covered locusts are apparently going down a storm.   Photo Source: The Times   7. White ant eggs soup, Laos One of the world’s more unusual soups, Gaeng Kai Mot Daeng combines a mixture of ant eggs and partial embryos from the white ant, plus a few baby ants to add sourness. If your stomach can handle it, the flavour is supposedly quite tasty: sharp and delicate, and a little like shrimp.   Photo Source: Backpacker Traveler   8. Crispy tarantulas, Cambodia These spiders were first eaten by Cambodians starving under the Khmer Rouge regime. Bizarrely, they became popular and are now served as a deep-fried snack throughout the country. Apparently they taste a bit like crab.   Photo Source: OMG   9. Balut, Philippines  This fertilised duck egg, with its partly developed embryo inside, is boiled alive and then eaten from the shell with salt, chilli and vinegar. You’re supposed to tap a hole in the top of the shell, sup the savoury liquid and then crunch down the rest of what’s inside – feathers, bones and all.    Photo Source: Kawaloing Pinoy   10. Escamoles, Mexico Escamoles are the larvae of a venomous ant species that lay their eggs deep down in the roots of agave or maguey plants in Mexico (so harvesting them is not a barrel of laughs). The larvae are said to have a consistency akin to cottage cheese and taste somewhat nutty; they’re normally eaten as the filling in a taco or omelette.   Photo Source: Couche Tard     Source: Roughguides    
    Jan 14, 2017 869  
  • 11 Dec 2016
    Japanese Cat Water Cake   Ever heard of a water cake? It’s a clear and jiggly Japanese dessert that looks exactly like a huge drop of water. This water mochi was first served and made popular by a confectionery in Yamanashi.          Source: Boredpanda  
    546   Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  • Japanese Cat Water Cake   Ever heard of a water cake? It’s a clear and jiggly Japanese dessert that looks exactly like a huge drop of water. This water mochi was first served and made popular by a confectionery in Yamanashi.          Source: Boredpanda  
    Dec 11, 2016 546  
  • 03 Nov 2016
      Paper clay also referred as Fiberclay is a clay type which consists of cellulose fibre mostly in the form of Paper (Mostly used paper are toilet paper rolls). Paper clay is a cheap & handy sculpting material. Easily available materials like toilet paper, glue, and a few other hardware store supplies are used to make paper clay. It's used for a smoother, more realistic finish. Paper clay only takes about five minutes to make, and it air-dries into a hard, detailed surface that can be painted. Photo credit: We heat it   Uses of Paper Clay   1. Paper Clay Dolls   Photocredit: Baby Doll ideas   2. Paper Clay Sculpture   Photocredit:eckmarkfineart   3. Paper Clay Masks   Photocredit: Etsy   4. Paper Clay Jewellery   Photocredit: Crafts India   5. Paper Clay Art   Photocredit: Alibaba   6. Paper Clay Ceramics   Photocredit: ceramicsnow
    2377   Posted by Artistter Team
  •   Paper clay also referred as Fiberclay is a clay type which consists of cellulose fibre mostly in the form of Paper (Mostly used paper are toilet paper rolls). Paper clay is a cheap & handy sculpting material. Easily available materials like toilet paper, glue, and a few other hardware store supplies are used to make paper clay. It's used for a smoother, more realistic finish. Paper clay only takes about five minutes to make, and it air-dries into a hard, detailed surface that can be painted. Photo credit: We heat it   Uses of Paper Clay   1. Paper Clay Dolls   Photocredit: Baby Doll ideas   2. Paper Clay Sculpture   Photocredit:eckmarkfineart   3. Paper Clay Masks   Photocredit: Etsy   4. Paper Clay Jewellery   Photocredit: Crafts India   5. Paper Clay Art   Photocredit: Alibaba   6. Paper Clay Ceramics   Photocredit: ceramicsnow
    Nov 03, 2016 2377  
  • 19 Oct 2016
    Technology & art are now related to each other. Earlier technology was only related to phones or laptops, but now when you imagine Art you can also imagine technology.   1. Tilt Brush Technology:   Imagecredit:tierrapost A look at the innovations and technologies that are shaping the future and changing the way things are done…. A new virtual reality trend is the field of art is introduced by Google called “Tilt Brush Technology”. This paint brush lets you paint in 3D space which gives painting a virtual reality. Now you can see your imagination through painting coming to reality.   2. ZBrush For Sculpturing: Imagecredit: digitaltutors ZBrush is a digital sculpting tool that combines 3D/2.5D modelling,texturing and painting. This tool is more focused on sculpturing as compared to other tools available. Z-Brush is used for creating high resolution models used in animation, movies & games.   3. Cyborg Art: Imagecredit: Art Abyss Cyborg Art is the art of man & machine. The concept of man-machine mixture has led to development of this art.Cyborg artwork is created by cyborg artists. The use of Cyborg art has increased in film industry.     4. L.A.S.E.R Tag Graffiti: Imagecredit: Hacked gadgets With few instruments such as projector, camera & a laptop you can now sketch over buildings & show your graffiti talent from afar. Developed by the Graffiti Research Lab, the open-source L.A.S.E.R. Tag system has now made this possible!   5. Robot Artists: Image credit: youtube The way technology is taking shape & robots are making their way in every walk of life be it industrial or household work, the art industry is also taking advantage from this technology.    
    894   Posted by Artistter Team
  • Technology & art are now related to each other. Earlier technology was only related to phones or laptops, but now when you imagine Art you can also imagine technology.   1. Tilt Brush Technology:   Imagecredit:tierrapost A look at the innovations and technologies that are shaping the future and changing the way things are done…. A new virtual reality trend is the field of art is introduced by Google called “Tilt Brush Technology”. This paint brush lets you paint in 3D space which gives painting a virtual reality. Now you can see your imagination through painting coming to reality.   2. ZBrush For Sculpturing: Imagecredit: digitaltutors ZBrush is a digital sculpting tool that combines 3D/2.5D modelling,texturing and painting. This tool is more focused on sculpturing as compared to other tools available. Z-Brush is used for creating high resolution models used in animation, movies & games.   3. Cyborg Art: Imagecredit: Art Abyss Cyborg Art is the art of man & machine. The concept of man-machine mixture has led to development of this art.Cyborg artwork is created by cyborg artists. The use of Cyborg art has increased in film industry.     4. L.A.S.E.R Tag Graffiti: Imagecredit: Hacked gadgets With few instruments such as projector, camera & a laptop you can now sketch over buildings & show your graffiti talent from afar. Developed by the Graffiti Research Lab, the open-source L.A.S.E.R. Tag system has now made this possible!   5. Robot Artists: Image credit: youtube The way technology is taking shape & robots are making their way in every walk of life be it industrial or household work, the art industry is also taking advantage from this technology.    
    Oct 19, 2016 894  
  • 16 Oct 2016
    The cuisine of India is one of the world's most diverse cuisines. Extensive immigration and intermingling of cultures during 16th century has resulted in this unique blend of cuisines. In the age of fast-food and frozen meals, a classic traditional dish is a delight to the soul and senses, along with the taste buds. Here are few lost receipes of India which are totally unique & creative!!   1. Murgh Zameen doz       Image Source: Rupalidean-Traveller&Foodie A star preparation of all time “Murgh Zameen doz” which is Chicken prepared with marinate including almonds, spices & yogurt. This dish is prepared with variety of spices, veggies & dry fruits. The thing which makes it different & unique is the process by which it is prepared & cooked. The marinated chicken is wrapped in dough & placed in an earthen pot to cook. It is this cooking style which gives it an unique taste.   2. Parindey Mein Parinda (Stuffed Birds) Image Source: Rupalidean-Traveller&Foodie A Mughal era delicacy called “Parindey Mein Parinda”, a highly skilled dish is lost in the complex world of cuisines. A creative & innovative dish where smaller birds are stuffed into bigger birds.  Different marinates are prepared to marinate the birds to be stuffed while cooking is done on ‘Dum’ a traditional cooking style.   3. Tavsali Image Source: Triphobo The traditional dish of Goa (India), “Tavsali” is an cucumber cake. This cake is prepared with yellow cucumber or dark green cucumber & is steamed not baked.   4. Lehsun Ki Kheer: (Garlic Kheer)         Image Source: Rajasthanpatrika Garlic as a sweet dish!! A exotic dish prepared by garlic is a sweet dish of Rajasthan (India). Rich in ghee (Clarified butter), milk & dry fruits this sweet dish is one of it’s kind which has garlic as key ingredient. Garlic kheer is served cold garnished on various occasions.   5. Pit Cooking Image Source: realfoodindia For meat lovers pit cooked food is the ultimate foodie paradise. Whole roasted pig, lamb, beef, goat, chicken are cooked in pit. Pit cooking is an ancient technique used in various cultures but have lost it’s charisma in today’s culinary trend. The meat is marinated covered with Chapati (Indian bread), rolled in aluminium foil (in ancient times it was covered with gunny bags), and is laid in the pit. This is than layered by leaves, hot charcoal or stones & covered with mud. The process takes long time to cook but the end result is an delicious dish.   6. Shahi Moti Pulao (Meat Ball Pilaf) Image Source: sewta food A lost recipe from Indian Cooking, Moti Pulao is prepared in Lucknow (India). The balls in the pulao are prepared from egg white. The egg white is given shape of moti (pearl) by boiling them in water. This is not just cooking but an artistic work!! Various versions of this dish are available. These balls are can also be prepared by minced meat & cottage cheese.  
    1617   Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  • The cuisine of India is one of the world's most diverse cuisines. Extensive immigration and intermingling of cultures during 16th century has resulted in this unique blend of cuisines. In the age of fast-food and frozen meals, a classic traditional dish is a delight to the soul and senses, along with the taste buds. Here are few lost receipes of India which are totally unique & creative!!   1. Murgh Zameen doz       Image Source: Rupalidean-Traveller&Foodie A star preparation of all time “Murgh Zameen doz” which is Chicken prepared with marinate including almonds, spices & yogurt. This dish is prepared with variety of spices, veggies & dry fruits. The thing which makes it different & unique is the process by which it is prepared & cooked. The marinated chicken is wrapped in dough & placed in an earthen pot to cook. It is this cooking style which gives it an unique taste.   2. Parindey Mein Parinda (Stuffed Birds) Image Source: Rupalidean-Traveller&Foodie A Mughal era delicacy called “Parindey Mein Parinda”, a highly skilled dish is lost in the complex world of cuisines. A creative & innovative dish where smaller birds are stuffed into bigger birds.  Different marinates are prepared to marinate the birds to be stuffed while cooking is done on ‘Dum’ a traditional cooking style.   3. Tavsali Image Source: Triphobo The traditional dish of Goa (India), “Tavsali” is an cucumber cake. This cake is prepared with yellow cucumber or dark green cucumber & is steamed not baked.   4. Lehsun Ki Kheer: (Garlic Kheer)         Image Source: Rajasthanpatrika Garlic as a sweet dish!! A exotic dish prepared by garlic is a sweet dish of Rajasthan (India). Rich in ghee (Clarified butter), milk & dry fruits this sweet dish is one of it’s kind which has garlic as key ingredient. Garlic kheer is served cold garnished on various occasions.   5. Pit Cooking Image Source: realfoodindia For meat lovers pit cooked food is the ultimate foodie paradise. Whole roasted pig, lamb, beef, goat, chicken are cooked in pit. Pit cooking is an ancient technique used in various cultures but have lost it’s charisma in today’s culinary trend. The meat is marinated covered with Chapati (Indian bread), rolled in aluminium foil (in ancient times it was covered with gunny bags), and is laid in the pit. This is than layered by leaves, hot charcoal or stones & covered with mud. The process takes long time to cook but the end result is an delicious dish.   6. Shahi Moti Pulao (Meat Ball Pilaf) Image Source: sewta food A lost recipe from Indian Cooking, Moti Pulao is prepared in Lucknow (India). The balls in the pulao are prepared from egg white. The egg white is given shape of moti (pearl) by boiling them in water. This is not just cooking but an artistic work!! Various versions of this dish are available. These balls are can also be prepared by minced meat & cottage cheese.  
    Oct 16, 2016 1617