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Top Articles

  • 13 Aug 2016
    10. Breaker boys working in Ewen Breaker of Pennsylvania Coal Co. (1910)            Photograph by Lewis W. Hine   What Charles Dickens did with words for the underage toilers of London, Lewis Hine did with photographs for the youthful laborersin the united States. In 1908 the National Child Labor Committee was already campaigning to put the nation's two million young workers back in school when the group hired Hine. The Wisconsin native traveled to half the states, capturing images of children working in mines, mills and on the streets. Here he has photographed "breaker boys," whose job was to seperate coal from slate, in South Pittston, Pa. Onc again, pictures swayed the public in a way cold statistics had not, and the country enacted laws banning child labor.   9. Lynching (1930)                                                                                                        Photograph from Bettman/Corbis A mob of 10,000 whites took sledgehammers to the county jailhouse doors to get at these two young blacks accused of raping a white girl;the girl's uncle saved the life of a third by proclaiming the man's innocence. Although this was Marion, Ind., most of the nearly 5,000 lynchings documented between Reconstruction and the late 1960s were perpetrated in the South. (Hangings, beating and mutilations were called the sentence of "judge Lynch,") Some lynching photos were made into postcards designed to boost white supremacy, but the tortured bodies and grotesquely happy crowds ended up revoltoing as many as they scared. Today the images rremind us that we have not come as far from barbarity as we'd like to think.   8. Little Rock Arkansas (1957)      Photograph from Bettman/Corbis   It was the fourth school year since segregation had been outlawed by the Supreme Court. Things were not going well, and some southerners accused the national press of distorting matters. This picture, however, gave irrefutable testimony, as Elizabeth Eckford strides through a gantlet of white students, including Hazel Bryant (mouth open the widest), on her way to Little Rock's Central High.    7. Biafra (1969)                                                                                                                                             Photography by Don McCullin   When the Igbos of eastern Nigeria declared themselves independant in 1967, Nigeria blockaded their fielding country-Biafra. In three years of war, more than one million people died, mainly of hunger. In famine, children who lack protein often get the diesease kwashiorkor, which causes their muscles to waste away and their bellies to protrude. War photographer Don McCullin drew attention to the tragedy. "I was devasted by the sight of 900 children living in one camp in utter squalor at the point of death,"he said." i lost all interest in photographing soldiers in action."The world community intervened to help Biafra, and leamed key lessons about dealing with massive hunger exacerbated by war a problem that still defies simple solutions.     6. Munich olympic village (1972)       Photograph by Kurt Strumpf   Terrorism is always disturbing, but when it plays out in an arena whose purpose is to augment global peace, it seems yet more ghastly. The athletes from 121 nations had assembled in Munich for the 1972 Olympics when, on September 5 at 4:30 a.m., five men dressed in tracksuits toting weapons in their gym bags scaled the fence of the Olympic Village and joined up with three others already inside. They rapped on the door of the Israeli wrestling coach, shot him and a weightlifter dead, then took nine Israelis hostage. The abductors, who claimed to be from a Palestinian guerrilla group called Black September, demanded that Israel release zoo Arab prisoners. By three o'clock the next morning, after hours of tenterhook negotiations, a botched rescue attempt left the nine Israelis dead, along with five terrorists and a policeman. Three terrorists were captured. This portrait of a goon haunts anyone who remembers the scene, and, for those who were born later, displays all too well the dark hand of terrorism.      5. Exxon Waldez Oil Spill (1989)                                                                                                                                                           Photograph by John S. Lough   On March 24. the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska's Prince William Sound, and io.8 million gallons of crude flowed into the bay, causing the worst maritime environmental disaster in U.S. history. A quarter million seabirds, 2,800 sea otters, 300 harbor seals. 25o bald eagles and more than zo killer whales died, and 1.30o miles of shoreline was fouled. The public outcry led to a U.S. law demanding double-hull construction in future tankers, and a jury ordered Exxon to pay billions, a verdict the company is still fighting. Meanwhile, in Alaska, more oil washes up every year.      4. Missing Milk Carton (1984)                                                                                                                                                          Photograph by Robert Frieder                                                                                                                                                           Johnny Gosch was a 12.year old from West Des Moines who vanished while delivering papers in 1982. Juanita Estevez, 15, of Yuba City, Calif., disappeared on her way to school in 1984. these were the first two kids to be pictured on a milk carton. Child abduction was becoming a growing nightmare, and families and authorities were eager to try any method. Since then, postcards with photos of missing children have been widely distributed by mail, and have proved fruitful: One in six of the kids in these and other photo efforts are recovered. As for Juanita and Johnny: She escaped from her abductors in 1986; he is still missing.   3. The Falling Soldier (1936)                                                                                                                                                                     Photograph by Robert Capa   It is perhaps the most famous war photograph of all time and it is certainty one of the most controversial. Loyofisr Militiaman at the Moment of Death. Cerro Mariano, September 5, 1976 is either a shockingly intimate depiction of a Spanish Republican soldier breathing his last during his country's civil war, as LIFE believed in '37 and most observers still maintain, or it is staged. as a British historian first argued in 1975. Either way, the image has long had a massive impact. In his zooz biography of the storied Capa, Alex Kershaw wrote that the 'truth- of the photo resides in its presentation of death: The Falling Soldier, authentic or fake. is ultimately a record of Capa's political bias and idealism ... Indeed, he would soon come to experience the brutalizing insanity and death of Illusions that all witnesses who get close enough to the 'romance' of war Inevitably confront."   2. Chicago Fire (1871)                                                                                                                                                                         Photograph from Corbis   The summer had been bone.thy. and on the evening of October 8, wind whipped wildly through the Windy City. Whether Mrs. O'leary's cow kicked the lantern, or a visitor dropped his pipe, or a cinder from a neighbor's chimney landed on the roof, the barn belonging to Pal and Catherine O'Leary of 13/ De Koven Street was soon engulfed. and when gusts blew the flames northward, so was much of Chicago. A third of the city was lost. including the downtown area; more than 2cio were killed. Urban scientists began to rethink their largely wooden infrastructures, and the notion of charity drives for the victims of disaster took hold.    1. Migrant Mother (1936)                                                                                          Photograph by Dorothea Lange     This California farmworker. age p. had just sold her tent and the tires off her car to buy food for her seven kids. The family was living on scavenged vegetables and wild birds. Working for the federal government. Dorothea Lange took pictures like this one to document how the Depression colluded with the Dust Bowl to ravage lives. Along with the writing of her economist husband. Paul Taylor. tange's work helped convince the public and the government of the need to help field hands. Lange later said that this woman. whose name she did not ask. "seemec to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me.'        
    223   3 Posted by Artistter Team
  • 10. Breaker boys working in Ewen Breaker of Pennsylvania Coal Co. (1910)            Photograph by Lewis W. Hine   What Charles Dickens did with words for the underage toilers of London, Lewis Hine did with photographs for the youthful laborersin the united States. In 1908 the National Child Labor Committee was already campaigning to put the nation's two million young workers back in school when the group hired Hine. The Wisconsin native traveled to half the states, capturing images of children working in mines, mills and on the streets. Here he has photographed "breaker boys," whose job was to seperate coal from slate, in South Pittston, Pa. Onc again, pictures swayed the public in a way cold statistics had not, and the country enacted laws banning child labor.   9. Lynching (1930)                                                                                                        Photograph from Bettman/Corbis A mob of 10,000 whites took sledgehammers to the county jailhouse doors to get at these two young blacks accused of raping a white girl;the girl's uncle saved the life of a third by proclaiming the man's innocence. Although this was Marion, Ind., most of the nearly 5,000 lynchings documented between Reconstruction and the late 1960s were perpetrated in the South. (Hangings, beating and mutilations were called the sentence of "judge Lynch,") Some lynching photos were made into postcards designed to boost white supremacy, but the tortured bodies and grotesquely happy crowds ended up revoltoing as many as they scared. Today the images rremind us that we have not come as far from barbarity as we'd like to think.   8. Little Rock Arkansas (1957)      Photograph from Bettman/Corbis   It was the fourth school year since segregation had been outlawed by the Supreme Court. Things were not going well, and some southerners accused the national press of distorting matters. This picture, however, gave irrefutable testimony, as Elizabeth Eckford strides through a gantlet of white students, including Hazel Bryant (mouth open the widest), on her way to Little Rock's Central High.    7. Biafra (1969)                                                                                                                                             Photography by Don McCullin   When the Igbos of eastern Nigeria declared themselves independant in 1967, Nigeria blockaded their fielding country-Biafra. In three years of war, more than one million people died, mainly of hunger. In famine, children who lack protein often get the diesease kwashiorkor, which causes their muscles to waste away and their bellies to protrude. War photographer Don McCullin drew attention to the tragedy. "I was devasted by the sight of 900 children living in one camp in utter squalor at the point of death,"he said." i lost all interest in photographing soldiers in action."The world community intervened to help Biafra, and leamed key lessons about dealing with massive hunger exacerbated by war a problem that still defies simple solutions.     6. Munich olympic village (1972)       Photograph by Kurt Strumpf   Terrorism is always disturbing, but when it plays out in an arena whose purpose is to augment global peace, it seems yet more ghastly. The athletes from 121 nations had assembled in Munich for the 1972 Olympics when, on September 5 at 4:30 a.m., five men dressed in tracksuits toting weapons in their gym bags scaled the fence of the Olympic Village and joined up with three others already inside. They rapped on the door of the Israeli wrestling coach, shot him and a weightlifter dead, then took nine Israelis hostage. The abductors, who claimed to be from a Palestinian guerrilla group called Black September, demanded that Israel release zoo Arab prisoners. By three o'clock the next morning, after hours of tenterhook negotiations, a botched rescue attempt left the nine Israelis dead, along with five terrorists and a policeman. Three terrorists were captured. This portrait of a goon haunts anyone who remembers the scene, and, for those who were born later, displays all too well the dark hand of terrorism.      5. Exxon Waldez Oil Spill (1989)                                                                                                                                                           Photograph by John S. Lough   On March 24. the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska's Prince William Sound, and io.8 million gallons of crude flowed into the bay, causing the worst maritime environmental disaster in U.S. history. A quarter million seabirds, 2,800 sea otters, 300 harbor seals. 25o bald eagles and more than zo killer whales died, and 1.30o miles of shoreline was fouled. The public outcry led to a U.S. law demanding double-hull construction in future tankers, and a jury ordered Exxon to pay billions, a verdict the company is still fighting. Meanwhile, in Alaska, more oil washes up every year.      4. Missing Milk Carton (1984)                                                                                                                                                          Photograph by Robert Frieder                                                                                                                                                           Johnny Gosch was a 12.year old from West Des Moines who vanished while delivering papers in 1982. Juanita Estevez, 15, of Yuba City, Calif., disappeared on her way to school in 1984. these were the first two kids to be pictured on a milk carton. Child abduction was becoming a growing nightmare, and families and authorities were eager to try any method. Since then, postcards with photos of missing children have been widely distributed by mail, and have proved fruitful: One in six of the kids in these and other photo efforts are recovered. As for Juanita and Johnny: She escaped from her abductors in 1986; he is still missing.   3. The Falling Soldier (1936)                                                                                                                                                                     Photograph by Robert Capa   It is perhaps the most famous war photograph of all time and it is certainty one of the most controversial. Loyofisr Militiaman at the Moment of Death. Cerro Mariano, September 5, 1976 is either a shockingly intimate depiction of a Spanish Republican soldier breathing his last during his country's civil war, as LIFE believed in '37 and most observers still maintain, or it is staged. as a British historian first argued in 1975. Either way, the image has long had a massive impact. In his zooz biography of the storied Capa, Alex Kershaw wrote that the 'truth- of the photo resides in its presentation of death: The Falling Soldier, authentic or fake. is ultimately a record of Capa's political bias and idealism ... Indeed, he would soon come to experience the brutalizing insanity and death of Illusions that all witnesses who get close enough to the 'romance' of war Inevitably confront."   2. Chicago Fire (1871)                                                                                                                                                                         Photograph from Corbis   The summer had been bone.thy. and on the evening of October 8, wind whipped wildly through the Windy City. Whether Mrs. O'leary's cow kicked the lantern, or a visitor dropped his pipe, or a cinder from a neighbor's chimney landed on the roof, the barn belonging to Pal and Catherine O'Leary of 13/ De Koven Street was soon engulfed. and when gusts blew the flames northward, so was much of Chicago. A third of the city was lost. including the downtown area; more than 2cio were killed. Urban scientists began to rethink their largely wooden infrastructures, and the notion of charity drives for the victims of disaster took hold.    1. Migrant Mother (1936)                                                                                          Photograph by Dorothea Lange     This California farmworker. age p. had just sold her tent and the tires off her car to buy food for her seven kids. The family was living on scavenged vegetables and wild birds. Working for the federal government. Dorothea Lange took pictures like this one to document how the Depression colluded with the Dust Bowl to ravage lives. Along with the writing of her economist husband. Paul Taylor. tange's work helped convince the public and the government of the need to help field hands. Lange later said that this woman. whose name she did not ask. "seemec to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me.'        
    Aug 13, 2016 223   3
  • 21 Aug 2016
                                                                                                                              source: Drawingpencil @veriapriyatno
    84   3 Posted by Artistter Team
  •                                                                                                                           source: Drawingpencil @veriapriyatno
    Aug 21, 2016 84   3
  • 24 Aug 2016
    Some say Shakespeare’s plays are evergreen, they will never come out of fashion. But what has changed since his first play Julius Caesar was staged at the Globe Theatre in 1599?   Female roles were played by men You may have heard of that in the 17th century England there were no actresses. Women were not allowed to perform in public theatres in England until 1660: quite an exception if we consider how much actresses were appreciated elsewhere in Europe, already bordering into stardom: think of Isabella Andreini in Italy or Armande Béjart in France. Not in England, though, where acting was not considered safe and morally appropriate for women. As a consequence, male characters were always played by boys or young men:  even the heavenly Ophelia in Hamlet or the feminine and fierce Desdemona in Othello.  Male actors were dressed in female clothes and had to wear heavy make-up to simulate a velvet like, elegant pale skin. It is said, although it is contested, that early make up artists were hired as well. Sometimes, hogs bones made into powder were blended with poppy oil to obtain a white paint which was then applied on the face. More often, however, the pale effect was given by the ‘ceruse’, a mixture of vinegar and lead: it was not uncommon that the boy actors met an untimely death by poisoning by this substance as it is extremely toxic.     Everyone could attend the Globe In The Globe Theatre, the theatre where most of Shakespeare’s plays were performed, everyone could afford to watch a play, unlike in other London’s theatres.  For one penny -the price of a loaf of bread at the time- everyone could buy a ticket amongst the ‘groundlings’, standing just around stage.. Of course, wealthier people also attended -they would get comfortable seats under cover. This way we could say the Globe was “democratic” as it tried to serve everyone while the quality of the plays and performance remained high. The Globe Theatre decided to keep this policy, as even today there are 700 standing tickets for every performance.   Actors didn’t learn a script In the Elizabethan era plays were a very last minute business, organized rather hectically. Actors didn’t have much time for rehearsing and many of them played into several plays as well asdifferent parts at a time. For this reasons, actors were not given the full script,  only their lines,   What’s more an actor’s part also contained their lines and their ‘cues’ – the last words spoken by another actor before their own. “Cue acting” was popular and apparently didn’t hinder the success of most of Shakespeare's work.     There was no real copyright In Shakespeare’s time copyright rules  did not exist: the Statute of Anne, the first copyright law of some sort, was enacted almost 100 years after his death. Therefore, it was quite common that rival theatre companies would send “spies” to attend Shakespeare’s plays and then make unauthorised copies of them, to edit, sum up and perform them elsewhere: obviously without paying the Bard what he was due. On the other hand, many contemporary scholars argue that Shakespeare himself wouldn’t have survived today’s copyright laws, as his way of sourcing was quite “free”.
    382   3 Posted by Serena Manzoli
  • Some say Shakespeare’s plays are evergreen, they will never come out of fashion. But what has changed since his first play Julius Caesar was staged at the Globe Theatre in 1599?   Female roles were played by men You may have heard of that in the 17th century England there were no actresses. Women were not allowed to perform in public theatres in England until 1660: quite an exception if we consider how much actresses were appreciated elsewhere in Europe, already bordering into stardom: think of Isabella Andreini in Italy or Armande Béjart in France. Not in England, though, where acting was not considered safe and morally appropriate for women. As a consequence, male characters were always played by boys or young men:  even the heavenly Ophelia in Hamlet or the feminine and fierce Desdemona in Othello.  Male actors were dressed in female clothes and had to wear heavy make-up to simulate a velvet like, elegant pale skin. It is said, although it is contested, that early make up artists were hired as well. Sometimes, hogs bones made into powder were blended with poppy oil to obtain a white paint which was then applied on the face. More often, however, the pale effect was given by the ‘ceruse’, a mixture of vinegar and lead: it was not uncommon that the boy actors met an untimely death by poisoning by this substance as it is extremely toxic.     Everyone could attend the Globe In The Globe Theatre, the theatre where most of Shakespeare’s plays were performed, everyone could afford to watch a play, unlike in other London’s theatres.  For one penny -the price of a loaf of bread at the time- everyone could buy a ticket amongst the ‘groundlings’, standing just around stage.. Of course, wealthier people also attended -they would get comfortable seats under cover. This way we could say the Globe was “democratic” as it tried to serve everyone while the quality of the plays and performance remained high. The Globe Theatre decided to keep this policy, as even today there are 700 standing tickets for every performance.   Actors didn’t learn a script In the Elizabethan era plays were a very last minute business, organized rather hectically. Actors didn’t have much time for rehearsing and many of them played into several plays as well asdifferent parts at a time. For this reasons, actors were not given the full script,  only their lines,   What’s more an actor’s part also contained their lines and their ‘cues’ – the last words spoken by another actor before their own. “Cue acting” was popular and apparently didn’t hinder the success of most of Shakespeare's work.     There was no real copyright In Shakespeare’s time copyright rules  did not exist: the Statute of Anne, the first copyright law of some sort, was enacted almost 100 years after his death. Therefore, it was quite common that rival theatre companies would send “spies” to attend Shakespeare’s plays and then make unauthorised copies of them, to edit, sum up and perform them elsewhere: obviously without paying the Bard what he was due. On the other hand, many contemporary scholars argue that Shakespeare himself wouldn’t have survived today’s copyright laws, as his way of sourcing was quite “free”.
    Aug 24, 2016 382   3
  • 22 Sep 2016
    Beetle Mania: Models Transformed Into Insect Inspired Artworks Artist Elvis Schmoulianoff ​inspired by Beetle "Goliath- one of the largest beetles in the world" started working on how the beauteous Goliath Beetle could be translated onto a human canvas. With the help of fantastic photographer Donatella Parisini, a couple of fabulous headpieces from Louise Lassay Designs (Goliath & Giant Mesquite) and 6 beautiful and wonderfully patient models – the series ‘Beetle Mania’ was born.    Goliath     Atlas   Forest Shield Nymph   Eupholus Browni   Picasso   Giant Mesquite       SOURCE: Boredpanda
    63   3 Posted by Apeksha Meshram
  • Beetle Mania: Models Transformed Into Insect Inspired Artworks Artist Elvis Schmoulianoff ​inspired by Beetle "Goliath- one of the largest beetles in the world" started working on how the beauteous Goliath Beetle could be translated onto a human canvas. With the help of fantastic photographer Donatella Parisini, a couple of fabulous headpieces from Louise Lassay Designs (Goliath & Giant Mesquite) and 6 beautiful and wonderfully patient models – the series ‘Beetle Mania’ was born.    Goliath     Atlas   Forest Shield Nymph   Eupholus Browni   Picasso   Giant Mesquite       SOURCE: Boredpanda
    Sep 22, 2016 63   3
  • 03 Nov 2016
      Paper clay also referred as Fiberclay is a clay type which consists of cellulose fibre mostly in the form of Paper (Mostly used paper are toilet paper rolls). Paper clay is a cheap & handy sculpting material. Easily available materials like toilet paper, glue, and a few other hardware store supplies are used to make paper clay. It's used for a smoother, more realistic finish. Paper clay only takes about five minutes to make, and it air-dries into a hard, detailed surface that can be painted. Photo credit: We heat it   Uses of Paper Clay   1. Paper Clay Dolls   Photocredit: Baby Doll ideas   2. Paper Clay Sculpture   Photocredit:eckmarkfineart   3. Paper Clay Masks   Photocredit: Etsy   4. Paper Clay Jewellery   Photocredit: Crafts India   5. Paper Clay Art   Photocredit: Alibaba   6. Paper Clay Ceramics   Photocredit: ceramicsnow
    65   3 Posted by Artistter Team
  •   Paper clay also referred as Fiberclay is a clay type which consists of cellulose fibre mostly in the form of Paper (Mostly used paper are toilet paper rolls). Paper clay is a cheap & handy sculpting material. Easily available materials like toilet paper, glue, and a few other hardware store supplies are used to make paper clay. It's used for a smoother, more realistic finish. Paper clay only takes about five minutes to make, and it air-dries into a hard, detailed surface that can be painted. Photo credit: We heat it   Uses of Paper Clay   1. Paper Clay Dolls   Photocredit: Baby Doll ideas   2. Paper Clay Sculpture   Photocredit:eckmarkfineart   3. Paper Clay Masks   Photocredit: Etsy   4. Paper Clay Jewellery   Photocredit: Crafts India   5. Paper Clay Art   Photocredit: Alibaba   6. Paper Clay Ceramics   Photocredit: ceramicsnow
    Nov 03, 2016 65   3
  • 08 Aug 2016
    North Californian artist Tahiti Pehrson has been working with paper for over fifteen years, and the experience shows. Each one of his hand-cut geometrical structures reveals dexterous and delicate attention to detail, with layers of intricate geometries rendered like magnificent large-scale doilies. Pehrson's work is inspired by guilloche, a decorative technique of engraving complex spirals and motifs that dates back to ancient Greece and Rome. The method was mechanized in France in the 1700's and has since been used to prevent the making of counterfeit currency. That connection with money and its universality is what drew Pehrson to the process. In an interview with Tiny Atlas, he explains: "I’ve always done money, because of everyone's love and hate relationship with it...Almost every currency has this type of engraved pattern in common." He creates his own patterns on the computer, draws over them, and cuts them out himself using number 11 blades. He argues that it's best not to prepare the full pieces on the screen, since that would remove the natural development of discovery that happens when transforming the original digital images into their 3D representations. Their final physicality, for Pehrson, is where "the humanness emerges," allowing an infusion of organic elements. Light and shadow play a particularly integral role, percolating through the sliced slivers to add texture that's almost hypnotizing.
    89   2 Posted by Sam Modi
  • North Californian artist Tahiti Pehrson has been working with paper for over fifteen years, and the experience shows. Each one of his hand-cut geometrical structures reveals dexterous and delicate attention to detail, with layers of intricate geometries rendered like magnificent large-scale doilies. Pehrson's work is inspired by guilloche, a decorative technique of engraving complex spirals and motifs that dates back to ancient Greece and Rome. The method was mechanized in France in the 1700's and has since been used to prevent the making of counterfeit currency. That connection with money and its universality is what drew Pehrson to the process. In an interview with Tiny Atlas, he explains: "I’ve always done money, because of everyone's love and hate relationship with it...Almost every currency has this type of engraved pattern in common." He creates his own patterns on the computer, draws over them, and cuts them out himself using number 11 blades. He argues that it's best not to prepare the full pieces on the screen, since that would remove the natural development of discovery that happens when transforming the original digital images into their 3D representations. Their final physicality, for Pehrson, is where "the humanness emerges," allowing an infusion of organic elements. Light and shadow play a particularly integral role, percolating through the sliced slivers to add texture that's almost hypnotizing.
    Aug 08, 2016 89   2

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